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    Lagos Fashion & Design Week – Day 4 Highlights

    Day 4 of the glittering Lagos Fashion & Design Week was the last in the runway shows, and what a way to end a week of great creativity, fashion and style.

    We were spoilt for choice in putting together our highlights on a day when the showcasing designers really pulled out all the stops with their innovation and creativity, a lot of them borrowing from traditional African influences but adding a contemporary edge we hadn’t seen at any of the other shows on such a consistent level.

    The ever-evolving Nkwo combined the old and the new with upcycled denim and re-imagined traditional Yoruba-inspired silhouettes. Similarly Ade Bakare’s luscious luxury fabrics and elegant balloon sleeves, IAmIsigo’s bold colour sports luxe pieces included traditional frocks complete with cowrie shell detailing, and House of Kaya’s beautiful flowing robes all carried a unique, yet distinctive African flavour that was oh-so-refreshingly authentic! It’s not possible to state just how refreshing it was. The prolific designer Lanre da Silva Ajayi’s collection, with custom designed fabrics in gorgeous geometric prints on flattering feminine shapes that stayed true to her signature, was another success.

    Congratulations to the organisers of LFDW, an event that’s proving to be a force to be reckoned with on the international fashion calendar.

    Take a look at what made the cut, and see if you don’t fall in love – photos courtesy of Heineken Lagos Fashion & Design Week.

    Lagos Fashion Design Week Lanre da Silva Ajayi Lagos Fashion Design Week Lanre da Silva Ajayi Lagos Fashion Design Week Lanre da Silva Ajayi Lagos Fashion Design Week Lanre da Silva Ajayi Lagos Fashion Design Week Tsemaye Binitie Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Ade Bakare Lagos Fashion Design Week Kiki Kamanu Lagos Fashion Design Week Kiki Kamanu Lagos Fashion Design Week Kiki Kamanu Lagos Fashion Design Week Nkwo Lagos Fashion Design Week Nkwo Lagos Fashion Design Week Nkwo Lagos Fashion Design Week Nkwo Lagos Fashion Design Week Nkwo Lagos Fashion Design Week April Kunby Lagos Fashion Design Week IAmIsigo Lagos Fashion Design Week IAmIsigo Lagos Fashion Design Week IAmIsigo Lagos Fashion Design Week IAmIsigo Lagos Fashion Design Week IAmIsigo Lagos Fashion Design Week Sisiano Lagos Fashion Design Week Sisiano Lagos Fashion Design Week Sisiano Lagos Fashion Design Week Sisiano Lagos Fashion Design Week Sisiano lfdw4 rayo lfdw4 rayo2 lfdw4 rayo3 lfdw4 house of kaya lfdw4 house of kaya2 lfdw4 house of kaya3 lfdw4 house of kaya4 lfdw4 Weizdhurm Franklyn lfdw4 Weizdhurm Franklyn2 lfdw4 bridget awosika lfdw4 bridget awosika2 lfdw4 bridget awosika3 lfdw4 lanre da silva 5 Lagos Fashion Design Week Lanre da Silva Ajayi

     

     

    Lagos Fashion & Design Week – Day 4 Highlights

    Day 4 of the glittering Lagos Fashion & Design Week was the last in the runway shows, and what a way to end a week of great creativity, fashion and style. We were spoilt for choice in putting together our highlights on a day when the showcasing designers really pulled out all the stops with their innovation and creativity, a lot of them borrowing from traditional African influences but adding a contemporary edge we hadn’t seen at any of the other shows on such a consistent level. The ever-evolving Nkwo combined the old and the new with upcycled denim and re-imagined traditional Yoruba-inspired silhouettes. Similarly Ade Bakare’s luscious luxury fabrics and elegant balloon sleeves, IAmIsigo’s bold colour sports luxe pieces included traditional frocks complete with cowrie shell detailing, and House of Kaya’s beautiful flowing robes all carried a unique, yet..

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    Things To Do in Lagos

    What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you hear the word ‘Lagos’? Be honest. Whatever it was you thought, most of us can thank the popular media for constantly feeding us some pretty negative images and narratives of corruption, war, famine and general doom and gloom. Frustratingly, in spite of things across most of Africa moving in a positive direction politically, economicall and socially , the popular rhetoric hasn’t changed much. And never more so than for Nigeria and particularly Lagos, the country’s largest city and the second-fastest growing city in Africa. But there’s a LOT more than is generally reported and certainly more than meets the eye in this bustling, vibrant metropolis with a population of over 16 million, as our blogger Mariam Bashorun can confirm. Mariam has just returned from Lagos where she went on..

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    Lagos Fashion & Design Week – Day 1 Highlights

    It’s the fifth anniversary of the Lagos Fashion and Design Week (LFDW), a fashion event running from 28 to 31 October, 2015, whose reputation is growing on the continent, attracting top international and local Nigerian designers of the highest calibre. Organisers say the platform aims to drive the Nigerian and ultimately, the African fashion industry, by bringing together buyers, consumers and the media to view the current collections of African designers and reposition fashion as a useful tool for commerce and creativity in Nigeria. Take a look at highlights from Day 1 (Photos courtesy of LFDW2015)

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    FT.com Features Lagos Fashion (& My Two-Pennies’ Worth, Of Course)

    Nkwo

    Nkwo

    Whenever I read something positive about Africa – and especially about African fashion – written in the mainstream press, it lifts me up. Literally elevates me. For those not paying attention to what the media covers in terms of Africa, being uplifted by one news article might seem a rather exaggerated response to something so seemingly trivial.

    But when you’re fully immersed in the business of promoting something as original and beautiful, and as yet relatively unseen on the global scene as African fashion, this is a small victory. To anybody who ever doubted it, I can wholeheartedly attest to the fact  that only a tiny part of what’s reported about Africa is positive; and in the fashion press, African fashion barely gets a mention at all.

    So waking up this morning to read this FT.com article by Melanie Abrams entitled ‘Lagos: Global Fashion Hotspot’ – which quotes me on why Nigerian luxury brands are doing well – has totally made my weekend.

    I met Melanie Abrams when she attended our Clerkenwell Pop Up Boutique in the Summer. She was interested in Nigerian fashion and what it had to offer the high-end international fashion market. She was curious about why Lagos had emerged as a clear leader in the luxury space, as opposed to other fashion capitals on the continent.

    Talking to her raised in me some interesting observations, and highlighted the huge opportunity that Lagos has to carve out a niche on the global luxury fashion scene. Economically, Nigeria alone has enough of an emerging middle class (and a substantial super-rich class) to fully sustain labels such as Jewel by Lisa, Lanre da Silva Ajaye, Iconic Invanity and Nkwo (to name a few) – and the majority of these designers’ customers are indeed home-grown.

    Jewel by Lisa

    Jewel by Lisa

    However, not only can these labels be desirable to Nigerians and other Africans, there’s also an international appeal to the diverse colours, textures and silhouettes that draw from centuries of culture and craftsmanship, which these designers are taking advantage of. What’s evident in Nigerian and also African popular culture (whether music, film, art or fashion) is that there is a certain pride in the influences inherited from past generations which perhaps wasn’t there before.

    No longer is the West the only source of inspiration to creatives across the continent. I remember growing up in a time when youth culture valued American music over local, and did our best to emulate every fashion trend coming out of London and New York. But thankfully attitudes have changed, and this new-found pride is what will drive the exportation of fashion, art, music and even film to the world.

    What remains now is exposure beyond the shores of Africa. Proper exposure: an alternative viewpoint, a steady drowning out of the negative vibes that are so often linked, bound even, to ‘Brand Africa’, and permeate even the editorial desks of fashion magazines.

    Lately we’ve seen high profile individuals like Michelle Obama and Beyonce Knowles don Nigerian labels with pride. And so must this trend continue. Which is why an article such as this (and many more of the same please!) are crucial to getting the global consumer to appreciate, trust and embrace what’s coming out of Africa as legitimate and worth a look. We must move from featuring Western labels using African designs as inspiration as a one-off, to covering African labels doing that as a matter of course.

    Sapelle isn’t a player on the luxury fashion stage, but I believe that continued exposure to top African labels and changing mindsets in the luxury space will see benefits flowing to the mid-market players we work with, who have lots to offer in terms of beautiful, original, relevant fashion for everyday wear.

    So hats off to you, Melanie Abrams and FT.com. And thank you for making my weekend!